DR. NATASHA TURNER ND'S BLOG

The Hormone Diet Workout Sheds Fat Fast

Posted May 8, 2013
Have you ever thought of the impact of your workout has on your hormones? For over 15 years I have been promoting The Hormone Diet workout as means to build muscle, increase energy, improve mood and decrease fat – while most importantly – avoid additional stress. So I was thrilled when I was contacted by CBC radio syndicate last week to complete 13 interviews across the country to discuss the results of research that showed high-intensity endurance exercise, such as running, is not the best means for women to lose weight, and in fact, could be harmful. This type of exercise can increase cortisol, and in turn boost belly fat, decrease metabolically active muscle, reduce thyroid hormone and spike cravings for comfort foods.
Instead I recommend short, high intensity circuit training workouts (30 – 40 minutes), while keeping excess cardio to a minimum. Study after study shows this hormone-friendly method increases your fat-burning hormones and, most importantly, your metabolism. This opportunity to get the word out about the right type of exercise for optimal hormonal response inspired me to create a Summer Shape Up Kit, which includes: one Clear Recovery – Strength & Energy Formula, one Clear CLA – Metabolic Enhancement Formula and the instructional poster for my 3-Day Metabolic Workout (laminated in 24 x 36 format). As a special bonus you will also receive a 30-minute Best Body Assessment at Clear Medicine with our Fitness Director. Now ONLY $111 plus applicable taxes. That’s $44 OFF the regular price! Note: The body composition test is only available in-clinic however the supplement package can be purchased online. Promotion ends June 30th! While quantities last.
References:

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Filed under: Exercise & Strength